Page is loading, just a sec...

01.

Prevent & End Conflict

Prevent & End Conflict

An end to human suffering requires political solutions, unity of purpose and sustained leadership and investment in peaceful and inclusive societies.

Explore More

Wars lead to prolonged human suffering and political turmoil. Humanitarian assistance may ameliorate such suffering and peacekeepers may stabilize situations, but they cannot create lasting peace and prosperity. Preventing and ending conflicts and building peace are recognized in the Charter of the United Nations as our first and foremost responsibility to humanity. Yet, that effort is not where our political leadership or resources are presently focused. The World Humanitarian Summit should be the turning point at which we reaffirm our commitment to our responsibilities as States, international organizations, the private sector, civil society and individual leaders.

02.

Respect Rules of War

Respect Rules of War

Even wars have limits: minimizing human suffering and protecting civilians require strengthened compliance with international law.

Explore More

Over the past 150 years and in the past two decades in particular, we have invested considerable effort and political will in strengthening the international legal frameworks gov erning the rules of war, promoting the protection of civilians, restricting the use and transfer of certain arms and ammunition, setting up human rights monitoring mechanisms and establishing courts to address the most serious violations of international h umanitarian and human rights law. Human rights advocacy and the protection of civilians are now a universal affair. Yet, our global landscape is still blighted with the brazen and brutal erosion of respect for international human rights and humanitarian la w. Every day, civilians are deliberately or indiscriminately injured and killed. Air strikes rip families apart. Women and girls are abused and sold as sexual slaves. Populations in besieged areas are deliberately starved, intimidated and deprived of essen tial goods for years.

03.

Leave No One Behind

Leave No one Behind

Honouring our commitment to leave no one behind requires reaching eve ryone in situations of conflict, disaster, vulnerability and risk.

Explore More

Leaving no one behind is a central aspiration of most political, ethical or religious codes and has always been at the heart of the humanitarian imperative. The pledge to leave no one behind is the central theme of the 2030 Agenda and places a new obligation on us all to reach those in situations of conflict, disaster, vulnerability and risk first so that they benefit from and contribute to sustainable long-term development. The World Humanitarian Summit provides a first test of the international community’s commitment to transforming the lives of those most at risk of being left behind.

04.

Working Differently To End Need

Working Differently To End Need

Ending need requires the reinforcement of local systems, the anticipation of crises and transcendence of the humanitarian-development divide.

Explore More

The Sustainable Development Goals constitute a new era in national and international cooperation and provide a comprehensive, transformational 15 -year results framework for all actors working to meet the needs of people. Success will now be defined by the achievement of measurable reductions in people’s risk and vulnerability and their ability to become more self-reliant rather than simply attain basic needs for years on end. This will put people and their humanity at the centre of all our efforts.

05.

Invest In Humanity

Invest In Humanity

Accepting and acting upon our shared responsibilities for humanity requires political, institutional and financial investments.

Explore More

Delivering on the aforementioned four core responsibilities requires acceptance of a fifth responsibility: investing in humanity. Greater political and resource investment in preventing human suffering is the most important investment we can make in humanity and the most critical shift we must agree upon at the World Humanitarian Summit. With the combined knowledge, technology and resources that we have today, it is unacceptable that the levels of suffering from conflict, disasters and other emergencies remain so high. What makes this particularly devastating and deplorable is that so much of the suffering could have been prevented or reduced if we had taken risk and early warning information seriously and invested in the necessary political, institutional and local civil society capacity early and sustainably.